The BC Children’s Mental Health Literacy Team 2017/18 Online Annual Report

The BC Children’s Mental Health Literacy Team is excited to share our 2017/18 Online Annual Report!  Here you will find all the great work and accomplishments of this 2017/2018 year, including in eating disorders. Enjoy every picture, story, and statistic that celebrates youth, family, and community.  The annual report allows us to highlight accomplishments and share the impact of our work with partners, funders, key stakeholders and leadership.

Owning our Health: From unattainable manly myths to the freedom of the “new” man

Today’s man is often equated with the strong silent type, with a super-fit muscular body. From action movies and superhero figures, to TV commercials, men and boys are bombarded with images of manhood that are near impossible to attain. Conversely, TV sitcoms portray the hapless male figure, overweight, emotionally insensitive, and often the subject of demeaning humour.

The ‘Other’ 25%: Males with eating disorders

Eating disorders are complex mental disorders that negatively impact quality of life and have serious health consequences, including death. For example, anorexia, one form of eating disorder has the highest mortality of all mental illnesses. If past statistics continue to represent the future, which we hope in the case of anorexia, they do not, as recent studies demonstrate that one in five persons with anorexia will die as a result of the disorder or its complications. Certainly this number would seem far too high to ignore.

Apple-shaped body more susceptible to binge eating disorder

Women with apple-shaped bodies -- those who store more of their fat in their trunk and abdominal regions -- may be at particular risk for the development of eating episodes during which they experience a sense of "loss of control," according to a new study from Drexel University. The study also found that women with greater fat stores in their midsections reported being less satisfied with their bodies, which may contribute to loss-of-control eating.

What I’m learning from my son’s eating disorder

For 60 minutes, I sat across the table from my 13-year-old son while he cradled his head on the table, sobbing. Every 10 minutes, he raised his head with tears streaming down his face, and said, “I hate you.”  I calmly responded,  “I understand, and I do love you.”

This was followed by a louder sob with his head returning to the same tabletop position. Remaining calm and in control was my best ammunition to not placate the eating disorder voice controlling his mind.

“Shell” – a memoir of a Victoria woman’s final year of life after a lifelong struggle with eating disorders

Shell, a Memoir. One Woman’s Final Year After a Lifelong Struggle with Anorexia and Bulimia - See video here: http://bit.ly/1WJplhw

If Diet Ads Told The Truth

The weight loss industry likes to pretend it's possible and healthy for anyone and everyone to be thin. But, as movements 

Shelley Fralic: The trouble with Oprah’s new diet ~Weight Watchers investment scores no points

Among modern women of influence, there are few as entrenched in the cultural consciousness, or as successful in turning the tide of public opinion, as Oprah Winfrey.

I know what you’re thinking. Oprah who? You mean the Oprah who used to be the world’s most revered populist preacher but slipped off the radar four years ago when she left her network talk show to make “meaningful television” over on her cable network OWN.

Canada's newest first lady, Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau, aims to raise awareness around Bulimia

Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau has mostly stayed out of the limelight as her husband Justin Trudeau rose up the Liberal ranks and led the party to a historic victory Monday night. 

Science Explains Why Anorexia Is So Tough to Cure

Even a short-lived battle with anorexia can be difficult to overcome, but the longer a person goes untreated, the harder it is to recover.

Anorexia May Be Habit, Not Willpower, Study Finds

Women who suffer from anorexia are often thought of as having an extraordinary degree of self-control, even if that discipline is used self-destructively.

But a new study suggests that the extreme dieting characteristic of anorexia may instead be well-entrenched habit — behavior governed by brain processes that, once set in motion, are inflexible and slow to change.

Pages