New PATSED 'Let Us Eat Cake' Podcast

The Provincial Adult Tertiary Specialized Eating Disorders (PATSED) Program dietitians Ali Eberhardt and Hannah Robinson are excited to announce the launch of their new podcast “Let Us Eat Cake”, coming this summer, 2019!

Trauma Uninformed

As a psychotherapist with more than 30 years of experience in mental health, currently working in the EAP field, I was very excited about the opportunity to receive training in critical incident stress management.  The fact that my training was going to be provided by Jeffrey Mitchell himself only added to my sense that I was going to increase my therapist tool kit substantially.

Eating disorders ignored by mental health programs

By Leora Pinhas, a psychiatrist working in the field of eating disorders. 

The results of a major biennial Ontario mental health survey released last month failed to include any data on eating disorders, a life-threatening group of disorders that are common only in girls.

The Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey, which questioned thousands of students from Grade 7 to 12 and is conducted by the Centre for Addictions and Mental Health (CAMH), contains 600 pages of findings in what is considered important today in adolescent mental health.

**NEW** Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre's Eating Disorder Website

 

Come visit the Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre's **NEW** eating disorders website!  Visit us today at keltyeatingdisorders.ca!

                                                 

Notice an error? A link not working? Email keltycentre@cw.bc.ca and we'll be sure to fix it!

Abnormalities found in 'insight' areas of the brain in anorexia

In a study of structural brain connectivity led by the University of Illinois at Chicago and UCLA, those participants with anorexia nervosa who scored lowest on a test measuring their ability to form insight had more connective abnormalities than other patients in brain regions linked to error detection and conflict monitoring as well as self-reflection.

A visiting philosopher of psychiatry from Canada believes changing the discourse around anorexia and addiction is critical to prevention.

Addictions and eating disorders should be viewed as "passions" in order to provide more effective treatment, according to a visiting Canadian scholar.

Oxytocin's role in binge eating

Summary: A study has demonstrated that variants of the Oxytocin Receptor (OXTR) gene contribute to why some of us overeat or engage in episodes of binge eating. Researchers investigated how the OXTR gene influences appetite, food preferences, food intake and personality risk traits associated with brain-reward mechanisms.

Who are the men, boys suffering from anorexia?

A new study by researchers from the University of Montreal reveals the current state of knowledge about anorexia in men and boys. "Most of the knowledge about anorexia pertains to females. However, about 10% of persons affected are males, and we believe this figure is underestimated," says Laurence Corbeil-Serre, lead author of the study.

Trauma is an Experience, Not an Event

It seems like “trauma” has become one of those household terms everyone talks about. I took a look at the number of average monthly Google searches for “trauma” in the U.S., and found that it has grown 22% in only one year. As with other terms that became mainstream (for instance “addiction” or “narcissism”), I suspect the price of increased awareness is a diluted understanding of what they really mean.

Where's the Change? Service User Views on Eating Disorder Services

There are few studies that explore what kinds of changes might be made to eating disorder services to make them more appropriate and effective. We tend to see more outcome studies that judge the effectiveness of the services based on their psychological, behavioural, and physiological effects – all very important aspects, but not the whole picture. One of the studies I look to when I’m seeking something a little more in-depth in terms of peoples’ experiences of eating disorder services is by Escobar-Koch et al.

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