Implementing Horticultural Therapy in Eating Disorder Recovery

Being out in nature, enjoying the warmth of a greenhouse, and working with plants all have a positive effect on someone’s mood and can also reduce anxiety. Because of this, horticultural therapy has been a valuable component of care across a variety of treatment settings, and is an especially good fit in eating disorder recovery.

Anxiety from contamination is a symptom that appears in those struggling with both eating disorders & OCD and related disorders. Horticultural therapy is a natural exposure that can be used to reduce anxiety and fear.

Teen boys' eating disorders may focus on muscle gain, not weight loss

Many people may mistakenly assume teen boys are not prone to eating disorders because their symptoms are different from what’s typically seen in girls and their focus is on building muscle rather than becoming impossibly thin, doctors warn.

What many parents and pediatricians consider classic symptoms of adolescent eating disorders, like calorie restriction and purging, are actually hallmarks of illness in girls, not boys, Dr. Jason Nagata of the University of California San Francisco and colleagues write in a commentary in the Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.

What does an eating disorder look like in men?

You might be surprised to learn that eating disorders will affect 10 million U.S. males at some point in their lives. Because eating disorders are commonly thought of as "female-only" conditions, studies have found that eating disorders in men are "underdiagnosed, undertreated, and misunderstood."

To treat an eating disorder, we need to know what emotion fuels it

Pinpointing how different emotional states and neural pathways influence our eating behaviours could pave the way for better ways to tackle eating disorders and obesity.

Eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia can have life-threatening consequences. They affect around 20 million people in the European Union, with an estimated cost of €1 trillion per year. The exact cause of an eating disorder varies from person to person and is influenced by factors such as biology, psychology and environment.

The Mindset of Eating Disorders

Looking in from the outside, it can be difficult to understand an eating disorder. Why would anyone want to throw up, starve themselves, binge until they hurt, or feel tortured by food?

But eating disorders serve a purpose for those who suffer from them. After all, Psychology 101 teaches us that behavior exists because it gets reinforced. Therefore, once we understand what individuals derive from their eating disorders—how bingeing, purging, or restricting meets a need—it makes way more sense.

World Eating Disorders Action Day spreads message of support and awareness

More than a million Canadians struggle with eating disorders yet there’s little help or support, report experts.

Today is World Eating Disorders Action Day , and advocates, health professionals, those affected and their families are highlighting why eating disorders can’t afford to wait.

Waiting is deadly: “Eating disorders kill more than any other psychological illness,” says action day co-founder Amy Cunningham, and the incidence of children with eating disorders is rising at an alarming rate.

How much does poor body image affect mental health?

Like it or not, most of us are aware of how we look. We have all had a bad hair day, or worried whether we are wearing the right clothes for a particular event.

The traditional stereotype is that young women are more concerned about their appearance than young men. Societal pressures, media images, and doting relatives saying how pretty a female child looks all have an impact.

But how serious an impact can it have on our wellbeing and our mental health? And just how much does our body image trouble us as we get older?

Improving care patients obesity recognizing weight-bias

Ask yourself what you think when you see a person with obesity: healthy, active, motivated? For many people these are not the words that come to mind.

People Who Self-Harm May Be Compensating For Their Difficulty Interpreting Bodily Signals of Emotion

Deliberate self-injury (without the intent to commit suicide) is widely thought to be a way that some people, especially teenagers and young adults, cope with or express feelings that they find overwhelming. However, a set of three studies published as a preprint at PsyArXiv by psychologists at Swansea University, reveals that difficulties with perceiving and interpreting the bodily signals of emotion may also play a role – a finding that could help inspire new treatment approaches.

Thirty years after anorexia onset, fewer ill than healthy

A study that started in 1985 followed some 50 people who had become anorexic in their teens. It shows that 30 years later, the majority were healthy but some had persistent eating disorders. The study, published in The British Journal of Psychiatry, was carried out at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

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