Collaborative Care in Eating Disorders and Non-Negotiables: Why do we need them and how do they work?

Imagine these scenarios…

You’ve been seeing a patient with severe anorexia nervosa for a number of weeks in therapy. Together, you have begun addressing and thinking about the core features that have contributed to the eating disorders onset and maintenance. But recently the patient’s weight has begun to drop, and she has not been seen by her GP. She says that she has fainted several times in the last week. You raise the issue of her going into hospital, but she says “that’s the last thing I want to do…”

Or…

Research illuminates positive body image in heterosexual and sexual minority men

In recent years, the body-positive movement has seen a rise in popularity and visibility. An overarching aim of the movement is to promote respect for all body types, regardless of characteristics like body shape, weight, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, physical ability, or gender.

Doctors to prescribe museum visits to help patients 'escape from their own pain'

A group of Canadian physicians will be writing a new kind of prescription starting next month — a trip to the museum.

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and a Montreal-based doctors' association are launching a pilot project Nov. 1 to treat patients to a day of paintings, sculpture and relaxation.

One of the doctors behind the initiative says a trip to the museum can benefit people with conditions from mental illness and eating disorders to diabetes and high blood pressure, as well as those in palliative care.

Apple donating 1,000 Apple Watches to help researchers understand eating disorders

Apple is donating 1,000 Apple Watches to help university researchers gain a better understanding of eating disorders such as binge eating or the more specific bulimia nervosa.

CNBC reports that the study is being carried out at the University of North Carolina.

Have Recommendations for Weight Restoration and Specialized Treatment for Eating Disorders Been Overturned?

A Position Statement.

A recent paper published in Psychological Medicine journal, titled “Treatment outcomes for anorexia nervosa: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials,” (https://bit.ly/2x1fWJU) has been greeted with mixed reactions by the eating disorder community. Over the past few weeks F.E.A.S.T. has heard from families and clinicians with concerns that this paper tells us new information: that specialized treatments do not work, and that weight restoration does not improve recovery.

Anorexia nervosa patients prefer underweight bodies

An interdisciplinary team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, the University of Tübingen and the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems placed test persons in front of their virtual selves and examined their self-perception. The aim of the studies was to investigate how accurately healthy women and men, including patients with anorexia nervosa, perceive their own body weight. The findings provide insights for new therapy approaches for people with eating disorders.

Abuse of Antidepressant for Weight Loss Leads to Seizures in Patient With Bulimia Nervosa

A recently published report in the International Journal of Eating Disorders describes the case of a 22-year old female patient who abused bupropion XR for the purpose of appetite suppression and weight loss.

More than picky eating—7 things Parents to know about ARFID

Most parents can attest to the difficulty of getting kids to try new foods. Picky eating is nothing new, but what happens when it involves many foods, never goes away, or gets worse?  Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) is an eating disorder involving an extreme avoidance or low intake of food. Dr. Julie Lesser, MD, child and adolescent psychiatrist at Rogers–Minneapolis, shares seven facts that you should know about ARFID. 

1. ARFID IS DIFFERENT THAN PICKY EATING.

3 Pillars & Principles of a Trauma-Informed Approach

You have probably heard a lot of buzz around being trauma informed as it’s a term that is becoming increasingly embraced. Many organizations are actively seeking out ways to ensure their programming and services are fit for this label, which means they are engaging in the following pillars of trauma-informed care:

Childhood trauma can leave scars on DNA, Harvard-UBC study finds

Children who are abused can be left with physical, "molecular scars" on their DNA that last well into adulthood, according to a new study from Harvard University and the University of British Columbia.

The findings could one day impact disease research as well as criminal investigations, though more work needs to be done before experts know how the "tagging" — known as DNA methylation — affects a victim's long-term mental and physical health.

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